YouTube Views Experiment, Results and Closing Thoughts

A month ago I started a test where I started monitoring the views of one vide, without any video footage attached to it, and just using a still image.  I wanted to see if it would get the same amount of views in a month, as a video where I was on camera singing just to see if it makes a difference.  At the end of the month, Weight of the World wound up getting 78 views, as opposed to my Inuyasha medley having 194 views in a month.  But, I also posted 3 videos this month, and one the month I posted the Inuyasha video, so I feel like that may have to do with the view count as well – Inuyasha was the only video posted the month it was posted, so if new people came to the channel, that would be the first video to click.  Since I posted 3 this last month, I think my view count got split between those three videos (they all netted about 60-80 views – Inuyasha got 194 in the first month, but do the math and that’s about how many the 3 videos got per month).

 

There were so many variable’s to this experiment, I feel like it didn’t quite work.  For example, my Terra’s theme video has only been up a week, and already has 63 views.  That has me singing in it, along with the album art for the cover.  However, The Witching Hour, which is an animation video, also got a decent amount of views – 69 in a few weeks, and doesn’t have me on it at all.  Even Weight of the World, which like I said is a still image video, still got a lot of views in a month.  So I guess the end result of my experiment is…the video format doesn’t really matter?  When posting consistently I got the same amount of views on videos, but like I said I’m still getting more traction from the being on camera videos (Inuyasha medley went up by 30 views this month, Terra’s theme is new and got the amount of the other two videos in less than a week).

 

At the end of the day, I guess just keep posting videos, you’ll get views and subscribers.  My experiment wasn’t really a failure, just a bit of an eye opener:  If your music is good, people will listen.  I think the best thing to do is have a moving video format instead of a still one, though:  Like if I’m not on cam, use game footage, or animations, because I do notice I get a lot more traction from a video that has a moving picture aspect to it.  I didn’t take into account the popularity of the tracks I’m doing either, so like not sure if that goes into account also.

 

So TL;DR:  This experiment was a semi-success?  It helped me see what to keep on doing on my channel, and what not to do, so I suppose it worked well!
If you’d like to see any of the videos I’m talking about, head on over to my YouTube Channel and take a listen!

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